Wednesday, August 2, 2017

Mégis hogy kerültem Japánba? - How did I end up in Japan? - 私、どうやって日本に来たの?

Nemrégiben kaptam egy felkérést a Határátkelőtől, hogy írjam meg a történetemet, mert biztos érdekes lenne. Nos, eltartott egy jódarabig, amíg elkészültem vele, de végülis sikerült. A magyar verziót ezúttal a Határátkelőn olvashatjátok... :)



I’ve been asked by a quite famous Hungarian blog about people who’ve moved abroad to write my story there. It took me quite some time to get this done, but now I’ve finished it. By the way, you can read the Hungarian version on the blog itself... ;)

I’ll be starting the story from a bit far away: towards the end of the university, there was an opportunity to work at a company in Berlin that we took gladly with a few of my friends. In the end I spent there about 4 years altogether. I got interested in the world of anime around that time. My interest grew so much that in the end I entered a Japanese language school to better understand what they’re speaking. My class broke up about a year later, but that time was more than enough for me to start loving the language and want to learn more about the culture too. So I continued my studies alone. And I started to fantasize about how it would be like to live here.

At the beginning of my last year in Berlin (in 2013 to be precise), it was obvious that the company wouldn’t survive for long, so I’d have to choose soon where to go. In the long run, I couldn’t imagine myself living in Germany, mostly because the German language that I never liked, so I didn’t speak it too well either. I didn’t want to move back to Hungary either, since my stomach couldn’t really take all the bad stuff that’s been happening there. So I decided that I would make my dream of moving to Japan come true. I switched up a few gears on my Japanese studies, I started spending about 2-3 hours a day with it. My plan was to get to a not-too-bad level by autumn, and find a company here that would take me in.

Ah yeah, by the way, in order to be allowed to work here, you need a visa. And you can only apply for it once you have a signed contract with a company. (And of course, most companies won’t talk to you unless you already have a visa and live here. A nice case of catch-22. :D) After quite a few tries, it became obvious that I wouldn’t succeed that time, so I’d need a long-term plan. The biggest issue was that I didn’t have any papers that’d verify my language skills, so I couldn’t really make any company notice my existence.

So my 3 choices shrank to 2: go to another company in Germany, or go home to Hungary. In the end, I chose to move back to Hungary, because I thought it’d be easier there to find a Japanese course / teacher without having to speak any German. And that way I could prepare more efficiently for an appropriate level of the international language exam. (By the way, my teachers back there were always too busy to spend time with teaching me, so none of them stayed for too long. In the end, I found a native Japanese teacher, but she moved back to Japan about 6 months later…)

But in about two and a half years, I still managed to get a paper that produced some interest from Japanese companies. Well, finding a job from abroad was still rather difficult even with that in my hand. Of course, my methods were probably quite inefficient, but that’s not the point here. In the end, I got a job and moved here and stuff in a bit more than half a year.

However, I’m very grateful for the two and a half years I spent at home. Thanks to that, I understood very clearly that I could never enjoy living there. And not because of the current government, or the politicians in general. They can be chased off anytime. But because of the people. Who are not even slightly interested in standing up for themselves. Who believe that they don’t have to do anything more than write an ‘x’ on a sheet of paper every four years for their own future, for the change they desire so much. The saddest thing is that most of them don’t even desire any change.

After spending four years in Berlin, my way of thinking got too far away from the people at home. When I got home, I simply couldn’t understand how people can accept all that shit so easily. Even my family and my friends considered a lot of things that made me throw up as “the way things usually go here”. To be honest, I felt like an outsider. Like I was alone, watching a completely different movie than the more than 9 million people beside me. I didn’t feel that I belonged there. So there wasn’t much that would stop me from making my dream come true.

By the way, I never faced negative prejudices. I was never called a migrant or anything like that. When I moved home, everyone was happy, and when I moved here, everyone was sad because I was going so far away. However, sometimes I was asked jokingly “Are you insane that you moved back home? Wouldn’t you have been better off in Germany?”

Of course, Japan is not a Paradise on Earth, it’s not always about living happily ever after. After spending almost a year here, I can nicely see the problems of this country. Some of them are rather deep… For example, the Japanese people are always afraid to say what they mean. They are also afraid of new situations. Especially the women. A previous relationship with a Japanese girl ended quite fast and painfully because of this…

But even with all of that, I feel much better here than in Hungary. Here, I can see a future ahead of myself (and my kids who will be born at some point). In Hungary, I couldn’t see that. For example, the Japanese government doesn’t want to destroy the public education. Thanks to that, the “school teacher” is considered a high-prestige occupation. A bit different way of thinking than at home. :) The average working hours at an average company can get really steep, but fortunately my workplace is very good in this regard: I work about as much as I did at home.

The Japanese people also consider all politicians evil, no difference there. :D Abe-chan also has his nice scandals, no need to worry. However, this is a completely different level than in Hungary. For example, here a minister can be made to step down because of some unfortunate use of words. And the prime minister is not considered a god either. They have the emperor for that. Oh, and the national holidays are not all about politicians saying stupid things in front of a crowd. People simply don’t feel the need for that on a holiday. Quite hard to imagine this in Europe, right? In any case, when we talk about Japanese politics, I always tell the others a few stories from home. That usually calms them down. :D



ハンガリーには、ハンガリーを出た人たちのストーリーを載せてるなかなか有名なブログがある。
そのブログに私も自分の物語を書くように頼まれたね。
完成するまですごい時間がかかったが、やっとできた!
あ、ちなみにハンガリー語のバージョンがそのブログに読めるね… ;)

今回のストーリーをちょっと昔から始めるつもりだね。
大学の終わりごろには、ベルルインにある会社に就職できる機会が出てきた。
私も友達と一緒に行っちゃった。
そこに全部で4年間ぐらい住んでた。
アニメの世界にハマっちゃったのはその時だった。
アニメのキャラ達が何を喋ってるかちょっとでも分かるために日本語の学校にも行った。
それほどハマっちゃったね… :D
日本語学校でのクラスは1年後解散になっちゃったが、その1年も日本語が大好きになる、こっちの文化を知りたいと思うことに充分だった。
その後一人で勉強を続けた。
で、ここで生活したらいいなぁって夢も生まれたね。 :)

ベルリンの最後の1年(2013年だったね)の始まりにその会社がもう長くないってことが分かった。
なので、これからどうしようかと考えないとダメだった。
長年ドイツに残るのが全然想像できなかった。
特に、ドイツ語が全然好きじゃないし、あまりよく喋れないし…
ハンガリーに戻る気も全然なかった。
その時にもそこで起きてることですっごく腹が立ってたので。
だから、「日本に引っ越す」って夢を叶えると決めた。
日本語の勉強をすっごく頑張り始めて、毎日2-3時間ぐらい勉強することにした。
秋まであまり悪くないレベルに着いて、私を採用したい日本の会社を見つけるって計画だった。

まぁ、ここで就職したいなら、先ずビザが必要だね。
そして、ビザが申請できる前、ここの会社との契約が必要だね。
そして、ほとんどの会社との話が始まるためにビザとできれば日本での住所が必要だね。
(ちょっとだけ大変だろう? :D)
色んな会社とやり取りしようとした後、すぐには就職できないと分かった。
もうちょっと長い期間の計画が必要で仕方がなかった。
一番の問題は、日本語力の証明書を持ってなかったってことだった。
そのせいで、こっちの会社達が私の存在に全然気付いてくれなかった…

で、3つの選択肢が2つになっちゃった。
ドイツで他の会社に行くか、ハンガリーに帰るか。
結局ハンガリーに帰ると決めた。
そうしたら、ドイツ語が喋れなくても日本語学校か教師を見つけるのが簡単になるはずだと思った。
国際日本語能力試験のふさわしいレベルに合格するためにね。
(まぁ、ハンガリーでの家庭教師たちにとって私の教育より複数のバイトのほうが大事だったので、長い期間手伝った人がいなかった。
日本人の日本語教師も見つけたが、その人は半年後日本に帰国しちゃったね…)

それでも2年間で日本語能力試験に合格した!
こっちの会社達も私の存在に気付いてくれるレベルにね。
まぁ、それでも外国からの就活が結構大変だった。
おそらく、私も結構下手だったし…
でも、それはともかく、半年ちょっと後、就職もできたし、引っ越しもできた!
めでたし、めでたし… :D

でも、2年半ぐらいハンガリーで過ごして本当によかった。
そのおかげでそこでの生活で永遠まで幸せになれないと明らかに分かった。
それは、別に政治家のせいじゃない。
その野郎たちなら、いつでも追いやれるし。
主に人達のせいだ。
自分たちのために何もしたくない人達のせいだ。
自分の将来が良くなるために、望んでいる変化のために4年間毎に「X」を1つ書けば充分だと思ってる人達のせいだ。
残念ながら、すっごく多い人は、その変化さえ望んでいないってことのせいだ。

ベルリンで暮らした4年間ぐらいで私と普通のハンガリー人の考え方の差が大きすぎになっちゃった。
ハンガリーに帰国して、何で、どうやって皆がその悪いこと全部そう簡単に受け入れてるのか全然理解できなかった。
私の家族や旧友達にとってさえ、そのほとんどが当然のことだねって認識してた。
私は、すごい吐き気がすることばっかりだったのに。
正直、自分が部外者だって感じだったよ。
9百万人ぐらいのハンガリー人と一緒に映画館で映画を観ても、私だけは全く別の映画を観てるって感じだった。
そこの一員だって感じが全然なかった。
まぁ、そのおかげで、夢を諦める理由があまりなかったね。

悪口されたり、脅されたりしたことが一回もなかったけどね。
「移民の野郎、この国を出ていけ」とかも言われたこともない。
(外国から帰国するハンガリー人がそうされることもたまにあるらしい…)
帰国した時に皆が喜んでくれたり、日本に来た時に皆がそんなに遠くまで行くことで寂しくなったり、悲しんだりしてた。
「帰国して正気か?ドイツで残ったほうがよかったじゃない?」ってたまに冗談として聞かれただけだったね。

もちろん、日本も楽園だとは思わない。
ここのフェンスもソーセージでできた訳じゃない。
(それは、ハンガリーのことわざだよね。 ;) )
1年間ぐらいここで暮らしてて、こっちの色んな問題が分かってきた。
こっちの文化の結構深い所から発生した問題もね…
例えば、実際に思ってることを素直に言うのが普通に皆怖がってる。
新しい状況、今まであまり経験してない状況が普通にすっごく怖がってる。
特に女性のほうだね。
そのせいで、こっちの女の子との恋人関係が結構早く失敗しちゃったね…

それでも、ハンガリーよりこっちのほうがはるかにいい。
ここなら、私や後で生まれてくる子供の前の未来が想像できる。
ハンガリーでそんなのが全然想像できなかった。
例えば、こっちの政府は全力でわざわざ国の教育システムを破壊しようとしてない。
そのおかげで、「学校の教師」って仕事がなかなかいい感じ、なかなか望ましい職業だね。
ハンガリーの考え方は全く逆だよ。
こっちの普通の労働時間なら、それは確かに危険だ。
まぁ、私の場合は結構運が良かったけど:ハンガリーで働いてた時間とあまり変わってないからね。

こっちの人達も政治家が皆悪魔だと思ってるね。
それだけが向こうと同じ。 :D
安倍ちゃんにも色んな美味しい不祥事があるね、心配いらない。
まぁ、うちとは全く違うレベルだけどね~。
例えば、ここは、大臣がちょっと悪い発言をしたら、引退しないといけないね。
その上、内閣総理大臣が神様に思われてない。
そんな趣味だったら、天皇陛下がいる。
逆に、ハンガリーなら、政府が毎日ありえないほどのお金を明らかに盗んでも何も起きない。
毎日そうしてる総理大臣が神様ぐらいの存在に思われてる。
すっごく多い人にね。

そう言えば、こっちの祝日も「どの政治家がどの広場で大勢の人たちの前でどんなバカなことを言ったのか」って話ばっかりじゃないよね。
こっちの人達は祝日にそんなことを聞きたくないだろうね。
ヨーロッパの人達には、こんなのが全然想像できないよ。
とりあえず、こっちの政治の話になると、皆にハンガリーの物語をちょっと話すことにしてる。
それでいつも皆が癒されそうだね。 :D